The Pope of Trash vs. The King of Kitsch: Watch John Waters Interview Jeff Koons
Art

The Pope of Trash vs. The King of Kitsch: Watch John Waters Interview Jeff Koons

Why hello there dear Filthy Dreams readers! Have we got a treat for you! Last night at The Broad in Los Angeles our favorite filth elder interrogated blue-chip artist and Michael Jackson portraitist Jeff Koons on subjects ranging from his menacing inflatables to children to John’s loathing of riding dolphins and their shared love and utmost respect for trash. Continue reading

Filthy Dreams’ Three Part Series On Mike Kelley’s Dangerous Blue-Collar Trash Aesthetics
Art

Filthy Dreams’ Three Part Series On Mike Kelley’s Dangerous Blue-Collar Trash Aesthetics

In honor of the Mike Kelley: Looking Forward symposium at MoMA PS1, as well as a perfect way to avoid the Santacon hoards on this snowy day, we wanted to make it easier to read the full series of co-founder Emily Colucci’s “Who Was Mike Kelley: A Genealogy Of Dangerous Blue-Collar Trash Aesthetics.” Performing a … Continue reading

Who Was Mike Kelley?: A Genealogy Of Dangerous Blue-Collar Trash Aesthetics (Part 2)
Art

Who Was Mike Kelley?: A Genealogy Of Dangerous Blue-Collar Trash Aesthetics (Part 2)

Well, hello again. Back so soon? I knew you couldn’t wait for my next installment of feverish Mike Kelley adoration. A quick reminder for those of you with short memories or at least blacked-out during the introduction of my previous essay (It’s been known to happen): I am constructing a genealogy of Mike Kelley’s art, … Continue reading

Who Was Mike Kelley?: A Genealogy Of Dangerous Blue-Collar Trash Aesthetics (Part 1)
Art

Who Was Mike Kelley?: A Genealogy Of Dangerous Blue-Collar Trash Aesthetics (Part 1)

From his early witty birdhouse sculptures to his use of dirty stuffed animals and bargain bin remnants to his enormous installations such as “Extracurricular Activity Projective Reconstructions #2-32 (Day Is Done)” and “Kandors,” Mike Kelley’s overwhelming and engrossing retrospective currently at MoMA PS1 asserts the importance of Kelley’s transgressive and brave aesthetic. Continue reading