Life As A Punch Line: I, Tonya’s Camp Resurrection Of Tonya Harding
Camp / Film / Trash

Life As A Punch Line: I, Tonya’s Camp Resurrection Of Tonya Harding

When I was eight years old, I wanted to be Tonya Harding. Well, at least momentarily. Playing outside on a particularly frozen day in 1994, I pretended to be figure skaters with a friend. Did I want to be Nancy Kerrigan with her perfect brunette ponytail, Vera Wang-designed white costumes and sophisticated poise? Hell no. … Continue reading

Over Ten Years Later, Is “Factory Girl” Still The Worst Art Film Ever Made?
Art / Film

Over Ten Years Later, Is “Factory Girl” Still The Worst Art Film Ever Made?

Last week, Vanity Fair published “Andy Warhol and Edie Sedgwick: A Brief, White-Hot and Totally Doomed Romance,” a rambling yet nostalgic look into Andy and Edie’s short-lived mutual obsession. Comparing Andy and Edie to, at once, Marilyn Monroe and Romeo and Juliet, the article is a lot, but it also managed to rekindle my fascination … Continue reading

Pay It No Mind: David France’s “The Death And Life Of Marsha P. Johnson” Ironically Proves Its Own Point
Film

Pay It No Mind: David France’s “The Death And Life Of Marsha P. Johnson” Ironically Proves Its Own Point

The most telling moment of the recently released Netflix documentary The Death And Life Of Marsha P. Johnson, directed by How To Survive A Plague’s David France, doesn’t actually feature Marsha P. Johnson herself. Midway through the documentary film, which focuses on the suspicious death of the activist, Stonewall veteran and “Rosa Parks of the … Continue reading

Express Yourself: “Strike A Pose” And The Limits Of Cultural Activism
Film

Express Yourself: “Strike A Pose” And The Limits Of Cultural Activism

“The irony for me was, like, I’m in a production to express yourself. I wasn’t being that at all with myself,” remarks Carlton Wilborn in the documentary film Strike A Pose. Directed by Ester Gould and Reijer Zwaan, Strike A Pose traces the experiences–both past and present–of the six (seven, if you include Gabriel Trupin … Continue reading

Eating (Out) The Other: Western Audiences And ‘The Handmaiden’
Film

Eating (Out) The Other: Western Audiences And ‘The Handmaiden’

Park Chanwook’s latest masterpiece The Handmaiden is a wonderfully claustrophobic, seductive thriller set in 1930s Korea, without any white persons appearing to save the day or infiltrating the plot. The film has received resounding praise from critics and audiences alike, proving once and for all that despite having no literal projection of themselves within the storyline, white audiences can find an all-Asian movie both entertaining and valuable. The film’s lucrative success condemns any excuses for whitewashing in order to appeal to Western audiences, which was most recently used by Chinese director Zhang Yimou in his film The Great Wall. Continue reading