Queerer NY: Our 7 Favorite Queer Artists/Collectives In MoMA PS1’s ‘Greater New York’
Art

Queerer NY: Our 7 Favorite Queer Artists/Collectives In MoMA PS1’s ‘Greater New York’

Who would have guessed Lady Bunny would become a central figure in MoMA PS1’s monumental survey exhibition Greater New York? Rejecting the survey exhibition trap of only showing the hottest, youngest and, let’s be honest, often underwhelming emerging artists, this year’s Greater New York takes a look at New York art in 2015 through lens … Continue reading

Filthy Dreams’ Three Part Series On Mike Kelley’s Dangerous Blue-Collar Trash Aesthetics
Art

Filthy Dreams’ Three Part Series On Mike Kelley’s Dangerous Blue-Collar Trash Aesthetics

In honor of the Mike Kelley: Looking Forward symposium at MoMA PS1, as well as a perfect way to avoid the Santacon hoards on this snowy day, we wanted to make it easier to read the full series of co-founder Emily Colucci’s “Who Was Mike Kelley: A Genealogy Of Dangerous Blue-Collar Trash Aesthetics.” Performing a … Continue reading

Who Was Mike Kelley?: A Genealogy Of Dangerous Blue-Collar Trash Aesthetics (Part 2)
Art

Who Was Mike Kelley?: A Genealogy Of Dangerous Blue-Collar Trash Aesthetics (Part 2)

Well, hello again. Back so soon? I knew you couldn’t wait for my next installment of feverish Mike Kelley adoration. A quick reminder for those of you with short memories or at least blacked-out during the introduction of my previous essay (It’s been known to happen): I am constructing a genealogy of Mike Kelley’s art, … Continue reading

Who Was Mike Kelley?: A Genealogy Of Dangerous Blue-Collar Trash Aesthetics (Part 1)
Art

Who Was Mike Kelley?: A Genealogy Of Dangerous Blue-Collar Trash Aesthetics (Part 1)

From his early witty birdhouse sculptures to his use of dirty stuffed animals and bargain bin remnants to his enormous installations such as “Extracurricular Activity Projective Reconstructions #2-32 (Day Is Done)” and “Kandors,” Mike Kelley’s overwhelming and engrossing retrospective currently at MoMA PS1 asserts the importance of Kelley’s transgressive and brave aesthetic. Continue reading