In Fatebe, Ebecho Muslimova Has Created An Abjected Double, A Vessel Of Curiosity And A Kind Of Superhero
Art

In Fatebe, Ebecho Muslimova Has Created An Abjected Double, A Vessel Of Curiosity And A Kind Of Superhero

Fatebe (“FAT-E-be”) is in the midst of the Lacanian Mirror Phase. “She’s starting to interact with her own image and own sense of self versus the drawing of herself,” says her creator, the New York-based artist Ebecho Muslimova. “[The film] Ex-Machina, popped in my mind; she’s looking at herself in a mirror, self-realizing. I feel … Continue reading

Weeping At The Seeping Beauty Of Band-Aids At David Lynch’s “Squeaky Flies In The Mud”
Art

Weeping At The Seeping Beauty Of Band-Aids At David Lynch’s “Squeaky Flies In The Mud”

Can Band-Aids be beautiful? Yes, those uncannily flesh-colored, rubbery, sticky and potentially slimy strips that cover any number of sores, scratches, abrasions and ruptures. When singular, Band-Aids are startling, but bunched together, they coagulate into a congealed mass, yellowing with slough, dead skin, sweat, and scabs. Physically repulsive, tactically terrible, sure. But, aren’t they just … Continue reading

You’re Invited To: Idol Worship at Smack Mellon
Art / Role Models

You’re Invited To: Idol Worship at Smack Mellon

Dearest fellow obsessives and maybe stalkers, I want to personally invite you, dearest Filthy Dreams compulsives, to come together to celebrate our collective fixations–our role models or filth elders, if you will, at Idol Worship, a group exhibition curated by your faithful Filthy Dreams co-founder that opens at Smack Mellon on November 16 from 6-8PM (and … Continue reading

Do Clothes Liberate Our Bodies Or Restrict Them?: Confusion And Potentialities In “Life And Limbs”
Art / Fashion

Do Clothes Liberate Our Bodies Or Restrict Them?: Confusion And Potentialities In “Life And Limbs”

The politics of liberation are essentially corporeal. The struggle for free will—for subjecthood—is defined by the ease and unease of the body. The fear of hunger is physical; the wretched horror of deprivation is one of bodily need. All emotional despair is felt as corporeal absence or excess. If I am so wretchedly miserable that … Continue reading

Filthy Dreams GIF Review: The Horror of Jeff Koons’s “Bouquet of Tulips”
Art / GIF Reviews

Filthy Dreams GIF Review: The Horror of Jeff Koons’s “Bouquet of Tulips”

Isn’t there something just so immediately hilarious about bestowing a gift nobody wants only to unveil it as even more hideous than anticipated? Ta da! This week, Jeff Koons perfected this show-and-tell act with the inauguration of his monumental and massively ugly Bouquet of Tulips in Paris as a memorial to the victims of the … Continue reading

Bad Sex, Bad Drugs, Bad Music, Some Good Art: Curatorial Trying Too Hard At The Hole
Art / Music

Bad Sex, Bad Drugs, Bad Music, Some Good Art: Curatorial Trying Too Hard At The Hole

Curating isn’t an easy job. At its best, the act of curation is its own form of artistic creation–a kind of creative essaying. The curator has a thesis derived either from his/her own observations about the world or filtered through a particular cultural criticism that is then supported through the arrangement of art objects. There … Continue reading

Nothing Gold Can Stay: David Hockney’s Desired Objects and Heartbreak In “A Bigger Splash”
Art / Film

Nothing Gold Can Stay: David Hockney’s Desired Objects and Heartbreak In “A Bigger Splash”

Near the beginning of A Bigger Splash, Jack Hazan’s newly restored 1974 semi-fictionalized film about British artist David Hockney, the artist’s studio assistant Mo McDermott says in a voiceover, “When love goes wrong, more than two people are affected.” When it comes to Hockney, he’s right. Hazan gives us an intimate look into how forcefully … Continue reading

The Corporeal Fragment: A Symbol of Revolution or a Rejection of the Postmodern?
Art

The Corporeal Fragment: A Symbol of Revolution or a Rejection of the Postmodern?

In her 1994 essay The Body in Pieces: The Fragment as a Metaphor of Modernity, art historian Linda Nochlin ties the genesis of modernism to the French Revolution, framing the guillotine as a symbol of the severing of inherited dynastic power ushering in an era of radical politics, creativity, and culture. The guillotine becomes representative … Continue reading